Lorna and I could be twins...if: her forehead was twice as large, she died her hair mousy brown, she took enough testosterone to grow a dashing upper and lower lip stash, she wore brown contact lens, and changed her fashion preference to include excessively starched and rigid apparel. Other than that (and a few minor physical and talent adjustments), we would be indistinguishable. Oh my! I just made up a new word! I think this one will be popular for years to come.

Twins Lorna and I could be…(if: her forehead was four times as large, she died her hair mousey brown, she took enough testosterone to grow a dashing upper and lower lip stash, she wore brown contact lenses, and she changed her fashion preferences to include excessively starched and rigid apparel.) Other than that (and a few minor physical and talent adjustments), we would be indistinguishable. Oh my! I just fashioned a new word! Me thinks this one will be popular for years to come.

Many of you know that I have a tendacity to make up words.

Some of you probably think it’s cute–even clever. Some of you wonder if I’ve lost my marbles, and some of you are sick of trying to sound out the darn things.

Well. Guess what?

I’m not the first one to erectifiy new words for the reading pleasure of an audience. Seems like Shakespeare, (a.k.a. The Bard) made up all kinds of words and phrases in his poems and plays and random notes to who knows who. And looks where that old-timey creativologist ended up! Well, yes, dead. But not forgotten.

You probably use some of his worderific or went-viral-before-viruses-were-discovered phraseoids almost every day.

Here are some examples of the 1,700 words he just made up out of thin air and ink. This list comes from what looks like a respectibubble source: No Sweat Shakespeare. If you want to know about this guy’s work, this is the place to visit. (I make up words, People, not facts–well, not usually…)

*accommodation

*amazement

*apostrophe

*assassination

*bloody

*bump

*control (noun form)

*countless

*critic

*critical

*eventful

*exposure

*fitful

*generous

*gloomy

*hurry

*impartial

*indistinguishable

*laughable

*lonely

*majestic

*misplaced

*monumental

*obscene

*premeditated

*reliance

*road

*suspicious

Cheez wizz, People. He did the same thing I do. There was probably the word “suspect” and it just didn’t fit in his dialog for Hamlet. So he just went ahead and changed it. Sure the actors and audience were puzzled, but, hey, it was just a play and they figured Shakespeare, being The Bard and all, was taking creatalicious licence.

And here are some common phrases that he is responsible for. He didn’t make up all the words in these phrases, but he put them together and they stuck.

*break the ice

*catch a cold

*clothes make the man

*disgraceful conduct

*eat out of house and home

*elbow room

*fair play

*fancy-free

*foregone conclusion

*give the devil his due

*green-eyed monster

*heart of gold

*heartsick

*hot-blooded

*housekeeping

*It’s Greek to me

*lackluster

*leapfrog

*live long day

*long-haired

*method in his madness

*mind’s eye

*naked truth

*strange bedfellows

*wear one’s heart on one’s sleeve

*witching time of the night

That Bard. He was as clever as a crow. (Crows are very ingenious, you know).

Ever wonder why Shakespeare is referred to as The Bard? I did. A bard is a great and powerful Oz-like poet. I’m paraphrasing from the same site that brought you all this other info.

If you’re ever wondering why I make up such silly-pants words, just think about the possibilification that either I’m channeling Shakespeare or I am his much better looking reincarnapathetic presence here to bedoozle you with our (his and my) collective wordoddities.

Hey, at least it’s a better explanation than what you’re proprobably thinking…